A long sleeved Vogue 9328

I wasn’t sure if I would have time this year to make myself a new dress for my birthday. I started this tradition when I turned 50, however I’m not being too strict with myself about this tradition. The dress I made last year was Vogue 9328, I made the version with a soft fluted short sleeve. The pattern offers several other sleeve options. Being a 70’s child and with the current 70’s trend I felt drawn to the balloon sleeve with a deep cuff.

I am also utterly in love with the beautiful Rachel Parker rayon collection for Dashwood. The two seemed to be a match made in heaven that I couldn’t ignore.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

I have been craving a long slow complicated make and thought maybe I could start something in honour of this years birthday and just finish it when I finished it. However with the lifting of lockdown social gatherings started to pop up.

The pattern is unlined and very straightforward. Given that I had already made the dress and knew the fit worked. Essentially I had already made a toile! I decided to go for this combo which I thought would be a pretty quick make.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

The one thing I do always say to my customers in my sewing class when they begin dressmaking is that just because a pattern is marked easy doesn’t mean it will be. A dress like this is very easy to make. However if you are not a standard pattern size you might end up needing a fair amount of work to get a good fit.

Last time I made it I was surprised that I didn’t need to do a full bust adjustment. The only alteration I made was to lift the back skirt seem slightly.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

A different style sleeve shouldn’t alter the fit so I cracked on with making.  The fabric is slightly lighter than the fabric I used for my first version. I think because the fabric is different I ended up with quite a few niggley fit issues.

Even though I had tried the original on to check it still fitted, overall it felt much bigger than my first version.

I had to adjust the darts, shaping more to my bust shape. I tapered the front bodice seam lines in and reduced the side seams. This in turn affected the skirt so I had to reduce the skirt to fit neatly on the bodice. There were more alterations than I imagined there would be having made it before.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

I love the way the neckline is finished. It has a bound edge, the centre front seam is stitched after binding to create a neat ‘V’.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

The sleeves didn’t disappoint and were very easy to make too. As with the last one I made I omitted the open back detail. For me on this style and my last I didn’t feel it would look right with the fabrics I picked and the way I would wear it.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

The deep cuffs are my favourite feature of the sleeve. I did reduce the width of the cuff quite a lot as I felt the style needed fitted cuffs to make the sleeve feminine.

Vogue 9328 from Bobbins and Buttons

I dug out my tan clogs to complete my outfit. I love wearing it.

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Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

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