A year of Lynn sweatshirt pattern hacks.

Last month I posted the last in my series of pattern hacks for the Lynn sweatshirt pattern. I thought it would be fun to review all the versions and talk about my experience wearing them over the last year.

When I decided to make the series I wanted to show how you could adapt a simple pattern to create different versions. I hoped to inspire you to have a play around and experiment not necessarily with only this pattern. Adaptations like these can easily translate to other simple patterns.

Little did I know that actually this style would become my wardrobe stable! These sweatshirts have been thoroughly worn over the last year and here are my thoughts:

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

  1. My first version was a sized up lengthened version. I made this in a super soft snuggly fleece fabric. A very simple hack and this is my most worn version over the colder months. Because of the fabric and the size it is so comfortable and warm. Working in front of the computer on cold days if this was in the wash I would really miss it!

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

2. This quilted version is my least worn, I loved the idea of this and I think the quilting works really well with the print. I have worn it a couple of times but it feels a bit restrictive and less cosy than some of the other versions. It is warm and comfortable, however probably not what I want from a sweatshirt. It now gets side lined in favour of one of the others.

It has inspired a new idea – I would like to try the same idea on a cropped wide sleeve Yvonne coatigan . I think the boxy element that the quilting gives it would work well in this style. Adding a lining would make this feel like a comfortable jacket. Because it has inspired a new idea I don’t feel like it is a wasted make!

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

3. My third version was an extension and adaptations to turn the sweatshirt into a sweater dress style. I did the same hack on a Theodor sweatshirt for my daughter. I am itching to make this one again because it is so comfortable and easy to wear. I know if I had been teaching during lockdown this would have had a lot of wear. However in reality I would really have preferred a plain or different print. My daughter literally wore hers endlessly. She has grown so much that it is a little short now. Both these are added to my re-make list!

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

4. This applique Lynn sweatshirt is definitely my favourite. Made in cotton/elastane French terry. I haven’t worn it that much mainly because I feel it is a spring/summer version and also I love the applique so much I save it for going out! I am struggling to remember what going out feels like!! I love it with jeans for low key socialising like a family get together or an afternoon coffee meet up. Hopefully with restrictions easing this will be well worn this year.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

5. This was a brain aching maths equation to work out how to calculate making a neckband for the style in self fabric or fabric with a different stretch percentage than the pattern asks for. I made this in cotton/elastane French terry which has a lot less stretch than the ribbing fabric suggested. My calculation for this version wasn’t quite right so the neckband is a little tighter than it should have been. I was extremely pleased to have worked it out. It is perfect for when you just can’t find a coordinating rib, especially for printed jersey fabric. I think I may well combine this tutorial with the sweater dress when I chose a print to make that style in.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

6. This was my first experiment with dying. I made this in cotton/elastane French terry. I wanted to create a dip-dyed layered effect with white, pink and blue. However despite following the dye instructions very carefully my colours merged. The overall effect was wearable but a little disappointing. I am keen to try more dye projects so I will carry on learning and trying. It was great fun to do. I have worn this version a lot because it is comfortable and easy to wear at home. It has recently been demoted to wearing for painting my new studio as it is the least special of my tops.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

7. This scrap busting idea came from my many makes using cotton/elastane French terry. I often have left over large pieces that are unavoidable. Pieces large enough for a sleeve and sometimes a front or back panel. I have worn this version a lot, I think this cotton/elastane French terry is a great weight of fabric, warm enough to wear alone but also cosy on cooler days worn with another layer underneath. I now save all my large pieces and occasionally look through to see if I have a combination that would work for my next scrap-buster sweatshirt.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

8. For this version I added a staggered hem and side vents. I made this in printed ponte roma. Similar to the applique version, I love this and wear it more as a top that I wear for casual going out, so it would have been worn more had I had more of a social life.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

9. Another scrap busting idea. As I write this I am wearing this version! It is on wash rotation with a few of the others. Also made in cotton/elastane French terry and today with jogging bottoms and an Angie top underneath.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

10. For my 10th version I added some simple sportswear panelling. I love this to throw on over a t-shirt when going out for a run in colder weather, it can easily be tied around my waist if I get hot. The sporty look means I have kept it purely for sports.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

11. I used viscose French terry for the 11th version. In this tutorial I shared how to create a neck facing. This is a useful technique if you have adapted or re-shaped a neckline. It also means you can make this style without rib fabric or maths. The lighter weight fabric makes this ideal for warmer weather. I loved wearing this over the warmer months.

Lynn sweatshirt sewing pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

12. For my final version I showed how to create a volume sleeve for the sweatshirt. This is an adaption which makes the simple top a bit more stylish again something I would wear more for low key socialising.

It was good fun creating all these version of the Lynn sweatshirt. I hope some of them inspired you to have a play around with the pattern or other patterns.

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Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

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