The Big Textile show – part three!

This is the last part of my report from The Big Textile Show. It did turn out to be a much bigger report than I first thought and by this point in the weekend I was on a mission with about an hour left before the show closed I could see I might not get finished….

The Silk Route

Specialising in silk fabrics. A huge selection of natural silks, textured silks and theme packs in small pieces or by the metre.

055

054

 

Art Vango

Supply a huge range of textile and fine art materials as well as offering a selection of books they have written.

056

057

 

Chrystal Rose design crafts

A treasure trove of jewellery making supplies and hand made glass beads.

061

062

 

The Crafty Quilter

Quilting fabrics, supplies and threads.

063

064

 

 

Rebellious Rags

Lynda is a textile artist, designer and teacher working with old fashioned techniques in a modern way. She works mostly with recycled materials.

065

066

068

 

Carol Devaney – carol.devaney1talktalk.net

This was Carols first show. She describes her work as art with stitch. I loved these super quirky character pin cushions and her take on Christmas stockings.

070

071

 

Leicestershire Craft centre

A wealth of craftiness based in Market Harborough. Huge selcetion of craft courses as well as a shop and a gallery.

073

 

Woolly thinking

June teaches peg loom weaving workshops and has developed a process of making high quality felted wool yarns for big knitting and crochet.

075

076

 

Waste to want

Use waste textiles and materials to create new useful products. These are balls of yarn made from the selvedge of scottish tweed…

077

078

 

Block Craft

Handcrafted fairtrade blocks made from sustainable Indian hard wood. They can be used for printing textiles and paper.

084

082

 

Felicity  J Warnes

This must be the ultimate collection of books on textiles, costume, embroidery, needlework and fashion. Felicity’s collection is over 20’000 books including many books that are now out of print . She is particularly passionate about fashion as she supports her daughters vintage business – a shop in Camden called St Cyr Vintage who also sells books.

086

 

Textile Traders

Beautiful textiles and beads from all over the world including Indonesian textiles and Thai Ikats.

087

089

 

Fabazaar

A collection of beautiful products sourced from around the world, including boiled wool purses, recycled sari silks, hand block printed textiles and felt jewellery.

092

093

 

21st Century Yarns

Hand dyed yarns, threads and fabrics.

094

095

 

Parvabrook

Yarns from specialist sheep, and adorable teddies as well as kits for them.

097

098

 

Sarah Homfray

Sarah is a specialist in hand embroidery she runs classes and workshops and is dedictaed to passing on traditional skills.

100

101

 

Slow Loris Textiles

This was where my time ran out and sadly didn’t get to discover what these beautiful textiles were all about and I can’t find a web link either.

102

 

Make me in beads – makemeinbeads.uk@gmail.com

Fran was my neighbour and was very busy running bead workshops through the whole event, she also has a number of books and some lovely beaded pieces of jewellery.

104

105

 

Time ran out! I think I did miss a couple of stands. I am sorry if I have . Along side this there were a number of workshops going on too, and guest speakers.

This truly fabulous show all took place in Leicester, no long journeys or parking issues for us locals. And so many local groups, textile artists and textile traders. A great selection of specialist textiles and so much passion. Lets hope there are many more years of this show to come!

 

Please follow and like us:
error
Posted in

Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.