How to line the Yvonne coatigan.

This is a tutorial to show you how to add a lining to the Yvonne coatigan pattern. Adding a lining to this simple edge to edge coatigan style definitely routes it in the jacket or coat category.

Lining the Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

I chose to make my version in a knitted coating fabric. In hindsight this would have worked really well as an unlined version because the fabric is slightly reminiscent of a heavy knitted jumper so it would probably have felt more like a cosy cardigan.  However it has still worked well with the lining. I do feel inspired to try making one in boiled wool for a touch of understated luxury.

It is worth mentioning that the fit of this style is designed to be loose and boxy which means lining works well. If you decided to cut a smaller size for a closer fit you may find that it feels restrictive and uncomfortable with a lining.

Lining the Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

How to make:

Start by drafting pattern pieces for the front and back lining:

Take the front and front facing pieces. Trace the front on a new piece of paper.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Lay the facing piece matching the edges on top of the traced front piece and trace along the facing edge as shown. You will notice the collar is a slightly different shape on the facing. Just ignore this as long as the front and lower edges are lined up.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Add 3cm as shown to create seam allowances. This allows 1.5cm seam allowance as the total allows 1.5cm on the lining and 1.5cm on the facing edge. Cut the piece out this is the front lining piece. Now repeat the process with the back and the back facing pieces.

Fabric requirements:

You will need the same amount of lining fabric the main fabric.

Cutting out:

Cut all the pieces in the main fabric as the instructions indicate.

Cut 1 x back lining on fold

Cut 1 pair of front lining pieces

Cut 1 pair of sleeves in lining using the main sleeve pattern.

To Make:

Make the main fabric up according to the instructions in the pattern apart from the hemming of the sleeves and lower edge.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

  1. With RST (right sides together) join the front and back lining at the shoulder seams.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

2. With RST and sleeve head matching to shoulder seam pin and stitch the sleeve to the armhole edge.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

3. With RST pin and stitch the front and back lining together at the underarm and side seam.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

4. Stitch a row of stay stitching around the back neck edge of the lining. The stay stitching should ideally be slightly inside the seam allowance but around 2mm.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

5. With RST pin the lining to the facing edge matching shoulder seams and centre back. Clip the back neck of the lining up to the stay stitching to allow the lining to fit more easily.Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

6. Place a pin 15cm up from the lower edge to mark the point to stop sewing. Stitch from this point around to the same point on the other side.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

7. Mark the line for the lower edge of the facing as instruction no.14 in the pattern. Stitch and trim. Turn to the right side and press.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

8. Trim a little excess off the lining lower edge approx 2cm. It is worth roughly pinning the lining in place to check how much needs to be trimmed. Trim the least you can as this will allow movement. If it is to short it will look distorted on the outside, if it is to long it will hang below the garment.

Once you have trimmed the lining press the lower edge and the edge above the corner.

Press the hem edge of the outer garment and stitch up by hand. Herringbone stitch is a good stitch to hem with so that you don’t see an stitches on the outside.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

9. Once hemmed pin the lining so it covers the raw upper edge of the outer hem by approx 1cm. Allow the lining opening above the corner to remain loose until you have pinned the whole of the hem.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

10. Fold the excess lining into a pleat in the corner. Slip stitch the lining from the point on the front facing where it is un-stitched around to the other side. Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

11. Using the same method of hemming for the sleeves stitch the sleeve hems the lining in place. You may not need to cut anything away from the lining for the sleeves I didn’t for this version.

Lining the Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Worn here with an Angie top.

Yvonne coatigan pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

 

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Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

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