Lynn hack 11 – Creating a neck facing.

This month’s Lynn sweatshirt hack turns the sweatshirt style into a simple top ideal for lighter weight jersey fabrics. I chose to make this in a viscose French terry which has a lighter drapey handle compared to the cotton French terry.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

How to make:

Start by making a pattern for the neck facing. Trace the neck edge of the top front and at least some of the armhole on to a piece of paper.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

  1. Draw in the seam allowance along the armhole (1cm).

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

2. Draw a second line also 1cm (seam allowance) next to the seam line. Shown here with a dashed line.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

3. Fold the sleeve pattern so that the underarms match. Crease the paper so you have a line for the centre of the sleeve. Draw a line in the crease. Place the front of the sleeve to the front pattern, matching the edge of the pattern to the dashed line.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

4. Now draw in the remaining neck curve along the upper edge of the sleeve pattern. You also need to draw in the centre of the sleeve. You can do this by folding the pattern towards you along the crease line so you can trace this edge. You can also lay a ruler over the crease line and draw above the crease, then remove the pattern and draw the straight line in place.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

5. This is the upper edge of your front neck facing.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

6. Now mark in the lower edge of the front neck facing. Measure down from the upper edge equally around the whole edge. I made my neck facing 9cm deep. You could go a bit smaller but remember you will take approx 1.5cm off with turning and edging.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

7. Add a 1cm seam allowance at the shoulder edge where this will be joined to the back neck facing.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

8. Join the dots to make a solid line. This is the front neck facing. Now repeat  the process for the back neck facing.

To make the garment:

Cut 1 front neck facing in fabric and lightweight fusible interfacing.

Cut 1 back neck facing in fabric and lightweight fusible interfacing.

For this version I extended the length of the sleeves and the body so I could hem them rather than adding hem and cuff bands.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

9. Apply the fusible interfacing to the facing pieces. With right sides together (RST) pin and stitch the facing pieces together at the shoulder seams. Neaten the inside raw edge of the facing.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

10. With RST pin and stitch the sleeves to the front and back bodice pieces. Neaten raw edges.

 

11. Fold the neck facing with the shoulder seams matched and mark the centre front and back with chalk or a small snip. Do the same for the centre front and back of the top.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

 

 

12. With RST and centre front and backs matched pin the neck facing to the neck edge. Stitch, trim and clip.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

13. Understitch around the neck edge on the facing.

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

14. Push the neck facing to the inside and press. You can hand catch the neck facing to the armhole seams to secure. Complete the top by joining the underarm seams and hemming the sleeve and lower edges.

Lynn hack 11 - Creating a neck facing.

 

Lynn sweatshirt hack from Bobbins and Buttons

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Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

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