Subscribers free pattern – Volume sleeve boxy top – How to make:

This months subscribers free pattern is the addition of a volume sleeve. I made this in a star burst sequin fabric to give the style some seasonal sparkle.

This version has a lined bodice and unlined sleeves. This is a useful technique that you can apply to other patterns if you are using a sheer or semi-sheer fabric. I love the effect of using a sheer fabric as sleeves, it has a lovely romantic feel. Lining the bodice of the same fabric means you can wear the top without showing your underwear.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Body measurement size chart

Fabric requirements:

This top works in a variety of fabrics. For volume sleeves with impact fabrics like this star burst sequin work well. You could try it in crisp cotton lawn or cotton and linen blends. Look for fabrics that are crisp for more dramatic effect!

Lining fabric for front and back.

15mm bias binding tape.

See pattern for fabric quantities

To Cut:

Use pieces A and B from the first pattern cut 1 each on the fold in main fabric and in lining fabric.

M – Cut 1 pair

N – Cut 1 pair

How to make:

The seam allowance is 1.5cm unless otherwise stated. If your fabric is very sheer you might like to sew the shoulder and side seams using a french seam so that the seams look neat on both sides. The instructions for this version show standard open seams.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

  1. With right sides together (RST) pin and stitch the back and front together at the shoulder seams. Do the same with the lining pieces. Press the seams open. (If you are working with s sequin fabric like this check if or how you can press the fabric on a piece of scrap – this fabric presses OK with a medium heat and a little steam and not to much direct contact).

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

2. With RST pin the top to the lining at the neck edge. Stitch the neck edges together.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

3. Clip around the neck edge.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

4. Pull the two tops apart so that you can under-stitch the neck edge. Stitch a row about 2-3mm away from the seam, stitching onto the lining ensuring you catch the seam as you sew. Push the lining inside the top and press the neck edge.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

5. With RST pin the side seams of the top, stitch (leave the lining free) Neaten the raw edges. If you are sewing sequin fabric neaten raw edges with a zig zag stitch on your sewing machine, not an overlocker. It is OK to use an overlocker on the lining fabric. The sequins will damage the knife of an overlocker and probably break a lot of needles too!

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

6. With RST pin the lining together at the side seams. Stitch and neaten raw edges. As this fabric is lightweight fabric  I have overlocked the seam together.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

7. Press the side seams – (for a seam overlocked together press towards the back). Pin the armhole of the top to the armhole of the lining, check that the lining and top fabric are not pulling and distorting the top in anyway. Stitch the armholes together.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

8. Prepare the sleeves. Run two rows of gather stitches along the upper and lower edge of the sleeve stopping and starting around 4cm from the edge.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

9. With RST pin the sleeve underarm seams together. Stitch and neaten raw edges.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

10. Make sure you have the centre of the sleeve head marked. Draw the gather threads of the sleeve head. With RST matching the centre of the sleeve head to the shoulder seam ease the gathers so that the sleeve fits the armhole. Pin and stitch.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

11. Trim the seam allowance to approximately 5mm.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

12. Fold one end of a length of bias binding, pin the bias binding to the armhole edge. Pin near the underarm seam with the raw edges matched inside the crease. Overlap the folded edge by a couple of cms. Stitch in the crease line.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

13. Bring the other folded edge over the raw armhole edge and pin encasing this raw edge.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

14. Stitch the binding in place close to the inner edge.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

15. Turn and press one long edge of the cuff band. With RST pin and stitch the short edges.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

16. Gather the lower edge of the sleeve until it is the size of the cuff band. With RST pin the cuff band to the sleeve edge (the un-pressed edge). Stitch.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

17. Working with the top turned inside out bring the folded edge to the seam line on the cuff band pin with the seams enclosed. Slip stitch this edge by hand.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

18. Neaten the raw edge of the hemline. Turn and press a 2cm hem. Stitch.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

19. Turn and fold a double turned 2cm hem, the first turn should be under 1cm followed by 2cm. This should bring the lining to sit just up inside the outer top. It is worth trying it on and checking before sewing.

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

Subscribers free volume sleeve boxy top pattern from Bobbins and Buttons

 

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Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

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