Testing the new Emily pattern.

Testing the new Emily pattern.

A couple of weeks ago I launched the long awaited Emily pattern. I seemed to have been permanently side tracked last year and taken away from developing the patterns I wanted to. This year I decided to try harder to stick to my plan…so far so good.

As usual a lovely team of testers tested the pattern and gave me useful and important feed back. They also sent me some great photos of the versions they made that I’m allowed to share!

Abi

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Abi made this lovely jumbo cord version without the optional centre seams, with the large front patch pockets. She inspired me to stock a range of jumbo cord because I think this fabric and style combo is perfect!

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Karen

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Karen made this fun star print needle cord version another ideal choice of fabric for this style.

The pattern includes the option of a centre front or back seam which is better for fabric economy and also adds the opportunity of making feature jeans style flat fell seams. However the way I had chosen to show this on the pattern created a bit of confusion for just about everyone. Thanks to the detailed feedback from Karen and some of the others I have changed both the pattern markings and the instructions to hopefully rule out any issues.

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons
Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Karen chose the curved front bib and back pockets. She has made beautiful work of those curves. I have a blog tutorial if you need any help with getting neat curves.

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

This is another fun idea and great stash buster. Choosing craft weight cotton or similar for your facings. I think it really adds a designer touch to your garment, it is also the perfect solution if your main fabric is bulky.

Emma

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Emma went for the inseam pockets and centre front and back seams. She also highlighted the advantages of a lighter weight fabric for the pocket bags especially if you are making the style in a heavier weight denim or cord fabric. This will reduce bulk and any unsightly lines at the hips. All useful tips and added to the final draft of the pattern.

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Debbie

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Debbie made this gorgeous version in ditsy floral with the bib front pocket. 

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

She finished the dress with dungaree clips, I like this mix of pretty and utility on one garment.

Louise

Emily pattern by Bobbins and Buttons

Louise made her version in raspberry herringbone twill. Keeping the style simple and pocket free, finished with buttons. A great blank canvas for wearing with different tops and legwear.

The Angie top was designed to be a useful wardrobe stable and an ideal partner to dresses like the Emily dress. For a snug fit downsize your Angie by one size but make sure there is the correct amount or more stretch than the pattern requires.

The Emily dress is currently available as a pdf only, the paper version will be available soon. I hope you enjoy the new pattern. Its great to see your versions if you feel like sharing your make on social media please don’t forget to tag us. #emilydress #releaseyourhandmade #bobbinsandbuttons

 

Please follow and like us:

Julia Claridge

I was about 6 or 7 years old when I had my first go on a sewing machine, it was an old hand crank machine that my mum used with her patients, she was an occupational therapist. I still vividly remember watching with amazement as the tiny perfectly formed stitches were created as I turned the handle. I Grew up in the 70’s and 80’s when buying clothes was less affordable and dressmaking was an answer to updating your wardrobe more regularly. My own mother was a talented dressmaker who made most of my clothes and my sisters clothes as well as a many for herself. I soon got involved with making my clothes, I loved the whole experience of picking out fabrics, trims and a pattern to create a new outfit, then going home to make a new garment or outfit. When it came to leaving school I visited a careers advisor who asked what I wanted to do next. My answer was ..Sew! Read more...

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.